Posted By:jennifer Mieirs
Email:
Subject:Re: Sister of Pushmataha
Post Date:October 16, 2002 at 14:38:33
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/pushmataha/messages/55.html
Forum:Pushmataha Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/pushmataha/

Per H.s. Halbert's notes, one of Nahomtima's daughter's sister to Oklahoma, married Charles Juzan, she is known as Peggy Trahern, from her inclusion in the Supplement's of Dancing Rabbit Creek. Oklahoma's daughter, Phoebe, also married Charles Juzan, later. I have seen references to a Shanke who married a Pierre Juzan, but all Halbert's notes I have read thus far sound like Pierre is actually what is known about Charles Juzan. Peggy and Juzan were estranged at his death, but she still filed a claim on his estate, along with his children by both marriages and Phoebe. THey lived in Lauderdale Co. AL, but Washington County Alabama is evidently where some of his land he received was, as there is also records from there. The estate took from 1838 to about 1840 to settle. Nittakechi is assumed to be the brother of Oklahoma. The following is the information I have on the family.


Descendants of Unknown Choctaw


Generation No. 1

1. UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW was born Abt. 1720, and died Unknown. He married COOSHA CHOCTAW Abt. 1745. She was born Abt. 1720, and died Unknown.

Notes for UNKNOWN CHOCTAW:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

All entries with an asterisk are unproven, many in this lineage are speculative.[play.FTW]

[Mieirs.ftw]

All entries with an asterisk are unproven, many in this lineage are speculative.
       
Children of UNKNOWN CHOCTAW and COOSHA CHOCTAW are:
2.       i.       PUSHMATAHA2, b. Bet. 1755 - 1765; d. 1825.
3.       ii.       NAHOMTIMA, b. Abt. 1760; d. Unknown.


Generation No. 2

2. PUSHMATAHA2 (UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Bet. 1755 - 1765, and died 1825. He married (1) IMMAYAHOKA Abt. 1795 in Tombigbee River, Okla Hannali, Six Towns Dist., Choc.Nation East. She was born Abt. 1770, and died Aft. 1835. He married (3) CHAM NAY Abt. 1780. She was born Abt. 1750, and died 1831.

Notes for IMMAYAHOKA:


I have a copy of the land scrip, whereas the land (4 quarter sections) is signed over to Sedley M. Lynch. It is dated 1852. Why the two don't coincide, I do not know. Apparently, from the document, it is apparent, that Immayahoka is also known as Jamesachikkako, and Lunnabaka as all three appear below to represent the same three children Betsy and Martha Moore and Haschalahurtibbi. Confusing to me is the reference of both Rene Logan and Tom Suzari as the guardian of Haschalahurtibbi.


DEED
(Widow of) Pushmataha to
Charles Land

Contributed by Diane Scocchio
Miss. County Court Records

HOLMES COUNTY DEEDS

Book A, pg. 37

Know all men by these presents that whereas the 2nd article filed as
supplement to the treaty of the United States Government and the Choctaw
People there is granted to me, Jamesachikako, the widdow of Pushmataha, late
Chief of the Choctaw Nation, dec'd, and for my children, four quarter
sections of land in trust and my children, to be located under and by the
direction of the President of the United States, and whereas Martha Moore,
Betsy Moore and Haschalahurtibbi, by his guardian, Rene Logan, who are the
only surviving heirs at law of said Pushmataha, did agree with me in the
desire that the said land should be sold and the proceeds thereof appointed
with the purchase of negroes and other property for our joint benefit,
relief and maintenance. Now, know ye that I Imaghoka widdow of the said
Pushmataha, dec'd., for and in consideration of the sum of two thousand
dollars in hand paid by Charles Land, of the State of Mississippi, the
receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do hereby grant, bargain and sell
unto the said Charles Land and his heirs and assign forever, the four
quarter sections of land so granted as aforesaid and all my right, title,
interest, trustee or otherwise, of, in, and to the said land, privileges
connected as made by the provision of the supplement to said treaty, as
foresaid. To have and to hold the said four quarter sections of land and
privileges to the said Charles Land, for the benefit of said Charles Land
and his heirs against all other person or persons whomsoever, claiming or to
claim, or either of us. I do hereby appoint the said Charles Land my
attorney for me and in my name to act for me and receive from the United
States Government of such office as may be appointed for the purpose, the
quarter section of land so granted, and to all things which it would be
lawful and proper for me to do and for the purpose of obtaining the
possession to said Charles Land. Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and
seal the 3rd day of January one thousand, eight hundred and thirty-four.
Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of the Indulger Pummeyyobaker,
(his mark) who interpreted the same in the Choctaw Language.

We the undersigned Martha Moore and Tom Suzara, the guardian of
Hachalahurtibbi, the only surviving son of the above Jamesachikako, widow of
Pushmataha, dec'd., and the only heir at law of Pushmataha, deceased, do
jointly and severally consent to the foregoing conveyance to Charles Land of
the four quarter sections of land granted to Lunnabaka for her and her
children, for the consideration of two thousand dollars, as aforesaid, etc.,
as above. 13 January, on thousand eight hundred and thirty-four. Wit: Rena
Ingram, Silas D. Fisher, Martha (X) Moore, and Betsie Moore,
Hachalahurtibbi, by Rena Ingram, his guardian.

Town of Midway, Choctaw. Personally appeared before me -named Lunnagaka,
widow of the late Pushmataha, deceased, and Martha Moore and Betsie Moore
and Rena Ingram for Hachakahurtibbi, who severally acknowledged that they
signed, sealed and delivered the foregoing four quarter sections of land,
etc. 13 day of January, 1834. (signed) John F. Vere, Lieut. Co. 3 Inf., Com.
of Post. [The Choctaws seemed to have two names for both Pushmatha and his
widow.]

A notation of the face of the above record, stating that the purchase of the
four quarter sections of land from the widow and children of Pushmatha,
granted him by a provision in the late Choctaw treaty, was to have been by
Charles Land and Abraham A. Halsey jointly. As far as the Land estate is
concerned, it said the widow and children with the consent of Halsey, have
released their interest therein to said Halsey. (signed) W, H, Johnson,
admr. Of the estate of Charles Land. (W. H. Johnson's wife was Charles Land'
s sister.

Notes for CHAM NAY:


A note r/t additional wives for Chief Pushmataha sent by Johnny Craven:

Alexis Favre did testify that he was descended from a full-blooded Choctaw woman named Pis-tik-i-ok-o-nay who was the daughter of Cham-nay and Pushmataha. Alexis Favre also claimed he was a full-blooded Choctaw Indian when he was clearly not and so his claims were thrown out even though much of it may have been legitimate.

What I have are two women, Pis-tik-i-ok-o-nay and Cham-nay both dying in the same year, 1831, right after the signing of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, which I think Pushmataha had worked on several years before, just before his death. Both of these women, or at least the daughter did, sent a representative to register their land under the terms of the treaty but they both died within a short time of the signing of the treaty which I find mysterious. Perhaps they both died of natural causes. That is possible. However, given the situation back then they could have died of unnatural causes as a way of preventing them from getting land they were rightfully entitled to.

Cham-nay lived on Yazoo Creek near Okechawahbahford in Neetuckachees district (now Lauderdale County, Mississippi. Pis-tik-i-ok-o-nay, the daughter of Cham-nay and the mother of Alexis Favre, was also a full blood Choctaw and lived near to her mother on Boagfookah Creek (now Lauderdale County, Miss.) (This was excerpted from the book on the Favre's by Jerry Heitzmann and Nap Cassibry, III)[play.FTW]

       
Children of PUSHMATAHA and IMMAYAHOKA are:
       i.       HASCHALAHURTIBBI3, b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.
       ii.       BETSY MOORE, b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.
       iii.       MARTHA MOORE, b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.
       
Child of PUSHMATAHA is:
4.       iv.       MATAHA*3, b. Abt. 1785; d. Bet. 1812 - 1830.
       
Children of PUSHMATAHA and CHAM NAY are:
5.       v.       RUNNING3 DEER, b. Abt. 1780; d. Unknown.
6.       vi.       PIS TIKIO KO NAY, b. Abt. 1780; d. 1831.

3. NAHOMTIMA2 (UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1760, and died Unknown.

Notes for NAHOMTIMA:


See notes under most of the children, it explains why I have placed people where they are. At this point this lineage is pure speculation, with the exception of a few facts.

Oklahoma is generally accepted as the son of Chief Pushmataha's sister, and is the father of Phoebe, who was married to John Charles Juzan.

From Halbert and Ball, Creek War 1813-1814

For these incidents, the writer is indebted to the late Mr. James Cassels of Newton County and Jack Amos, a Choctaw, of the same county. Both related the same identical facts, Mr. Cassels receiving the information from Pierre Juzan, and Amos, from Oklahoma. Amos is a nephew of Oklahoma and grand nephew of Pushmataha, being a grandson of Nahotima, a sister of Pushmataha.

This is also in several places in Oklahoma Historical Volumes.

It is my opinion, that Nahotima/Natoma/Natona is not the daughter of Shumaka, and the grandmother of Greenwood Lelfore, and that Shumaka was not the mother, sister or wife of Pushmataha. Since the choctaw did have different wives, and they could be of different clans, it is possible, however, since both Cushman, and Inez Von Derau in the 1st 300 years, don't support the theory they are the same, I chose to believe, at this point it is very unlikely.

And if these two women were in fact the same, that the Choctaw children (which I have seen include Nitakekki as well) listed are not the full sisters and brothers to the Cravaat sisters, but where born earlier. Recently, I saw a gedcom saying Pushmataha's wife was the daughter of Shumaka, this would make Leflore, his nephew by marriage.

Additionally, the name Cravaat has been attributed to Oklahoma and Phoebe, which I believe is an error. Whether it is because Oklahoma has been stated to have been married to Polly Cravaat (which would have had to been the daughter of the Chickasaw woman John Cravaat had a family with after Nahomtima died, if she was indeed the same woman as some folks think), or because the name Nahomtima has been attributed to both Oklahoma and Greenwood, and since it is known, Greenwood Leflore was the grandson of John Cravatt, the same last name was assumed. Polly Cravaat Fillecutchy is listed right after Oklahoma's name on the supplement of the treaty, I believe people have misread it as it says Oklahoma and Polly Fillecutchy to meant they were married, instead of seperate individuals benefiting in the treaty.
       
Children of NAHOMTIMA are:
7.       i.       NAHOMTIMA3, b. Abt. 1777; d. Unknown.
8.       ii.       MARGARET, b. Abt. 1780, mississipi; d. Aft. 1846, mississipi.
9.       iii.       OKALAHHOMA, b. Bet. 1780 - 1784, Choctaw Nation, MS; d. 1845, Lauderdale County, MS.
       iv.       SHANKE*, b. Abt. 1782; d. Unknown.

Notes for SHANKE*:


This is pure speculative at this point, there are several discussions amongst genealogists related to who is related to who, who was or wasn't a sister of Chief Pushmataha, etc. As I find more information I will update it.


This is a far out speculation based on a rumor that Pierre Juzan had his sons by a sister to a Choctaw Chief. The reference to Shanke in reguards to John Charles Juzan, may in fact come into play with his wives, not as his mother.

A Shanke is listed on the Armstrong Rolls, with young children.

10.       v.       NITAKECHI, b. Abt. 1785; d. Abt. 1845, Lauderdale county, MS.
       vi.       TAPPENAHOMA, b. Abt. 1786; d. Unknown.

Notes for TAPPENAHOMA:


Allegedly also briefly Chief of the Choctaw prior to removal, some authors have he is one and the same as Oklahoma.


Generation No. 3

4. MATAHA*3 (PUSHMATAHA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1785, and died Bet. 1812 - 1830.

Notes for MATAHA*:


Chief Pushmataha's 2nd Lieutenent during Creek Indian Wars, and War of 1812, said to be his brother. Took the name of Redmond after the war. Supposedly had another son.

I have heard that Nitacekki was the son of this man, and also I have heard he was brother to Oklahoma, son of his sister, Nahomtima, I do not know which is correct.

I have also seen Mataha listed as son of Pushmataha, we do know that Push had an older son, who had died prior to 1830.
       
Child of MATAHA* is:
       i.       GEORGE4 REDMOND, b. Abt. 1805; d. Unknown.

5. RUNNING3 DEER (PUSHMATAHA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1780, and died Unknown.

Notes for RUNNING DEER:
Not proven child of Pushmataha
       
Child of RUNNING DEER is:
       i.       SON4 ANDERSON, b. Abt. 1810; d. Unknown.

6. PIS TIKIO KO3 NAY (PUSHMATAHA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1780, and died 1831.
       
Child of PIS TIKIO KO NAY is:
       i.       ALEXANDER4 FAVRE, b. Aft. 1810.

7. NAHOMTIMA3 (NAHOMTIMA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1777, and died Unknown. She married APSOMTUBBEE. He was born Abt. 1775, and died Unknown.

Notes for NAHOMTIMA:
More than likely, this is the woman who is listed on the Armstrong Rolls, Nahomtima, 2 children over 10, and 2 under 10
       
Child of NAHOMTIMA and APSOMTUBBEE is:
       i.       JACK4 AMOS, b. Abt. 1820; d. Unknown.

Notes for JACK AMOS:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

Jack Amos per various testimonies, and notes of H.S. Halbert, stated he was the grandson of Nahomtima, and nephew of Pushmataha. As of yet, his parentage is unknown.[play.FTW]

[Mieirs.ftw]

Jack Amos per various testimonies, and notes of H.S. Halbert, stated he was the grandson of Nahomtima, and nephew of Pushmataha. As of yet, his parentage is unknown.

8. MARGARET3 (NAHOMTIMA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1780 in mississipi, and died Aft. 1846 in mississipi. She met (1) CHARLES JUZAN Abt. 1792, son of PIERRE JUZAN and CHOCTAW MOTHER. He was born Abt. 1775, and died 1839. She met (2) UNKNOWN TRAHERN Abt. 1812, son of NEHEMIAH TRAHERN and AMELIA UNKNOWN. He was born 1770, and died Unknown.

Notes for MARGARET:


Peggy is in the supplement to the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. I have a copy of the land document which lists the names of her two fatherless children, as mentioned, below in the supplement, article 2 of the Treaty of dancing rabbit creek. According to some researchers, Peggy was half french, yet her son James, claimed he was 1/2 choctaw, as did his children. Another note, is that by all appearances, his father was a white man, so for that reason, I believe Peggy was not a french indian, but a full blooded choctaw.





Registered for a reserve for herself and her "two
fatherless children" by the 1830 treaty. She was then living outside the
Choctaw Nation. In 1831 she was enrolled in LeFlore's district. She was
allowed 480 acres by the 1830 treaty, and was given the E1/2 S7 T22
R5E in Yalobusha County, Mississippi (she had additional acreage, see note under son James)






Notes for CHARLES JUZAN:


Rumored to be 1/2 choctaw
Children's names with asterisks do not have the relationship of their mother proven. See notes under Phoebe, and below.

The family of John Charles Juzan, and his wives is a mass of rumor and contradiction. I am attempting to discuss the information here, as I doubt that we will ever have substantial "proof".

From Hebert and Ball, Creek War 1813-1814, Ch. 3
Pierre Juzan, a noted French Indian countryman, at this time was living at Chunky Town. He had settled among the Choctaws in early life, and had married a Choctaw woman, a niece of Pushmataha, and raised an Indian family. He spoke English, French, and Choctaw with equal fluency. Juzan had several trading houses among the Choctaws, one being at Coosha Town, situated three or four miles southeast of old Daleville, on the right bank of Issuba In Kannia bok (Lost Horse Creek), and another at Chunky. His dwelling house at Chunky was on the west side of the creek and about two hundred yards from it. He had here an apple orchard,--a rare thing in an Indian country--the trees or scions for which he had brought from France. He also had another residence at Coosha. Juzan died about 1840, at Tuscahoma, on the Tombigbee. Some time after his death, his family, with the exception of a daughter, emigrated west.


The details that he describes of the life of Pierre Juzan, mirror that of Charles Juzan. So the question is, was there a Pierre and Charles Juzan, that were brothers, either half or full brothers, or was Charles Juzan known as Pierre, then Charles?

From Halbert, H.S. in The Sketches of Choctaws, Mingo's and Indian countrymen and families
we find the statement that Oklahoma had two sisters, one married to Pierre, and the other to Charles, he further goes on to say that Pierre was the uncle of Charles, which couldn't be true. Pierre Francois Juzan was raised by his mother's family. His father died before his birth in the French Indian wars, and his mother died within a few months after his birth. If there was a Pierre at the same time as John Charles Juzan it was either his father or a brother.

We know from the deed from Oklahoma to Phoebe Juzan, and from her filing a dower claim in Washington County, (I think AL) in 1839, that she was married to Juzan. However, she was not the sister of Oklahoma, but his daughter. The legend of Shanke comes from, I believe records in different historical societies that come from the descendants of Eliza Ann Flack. Eliza Ann Flack, handed down the following statement to her descendants ....

Successor as Chief fell to his nephew (on his wife's side) by name of Oklahoma. He had a nephew named Nitakachieubih (Nitakechi). Pushmataha's sister was Natona. Her daughter Shanke who had a daughter. Natona's great grand daughter was Eliza Ann Juzan Flack. John Charles Juzan took 2 wives, nieces of Pushmataha -- Peggy Trahern and Phoebe, dau of Oklahome.




Whichever theory is true, undoubtedly, Peggy Trahern's relationship with John Charles Juzan fell apart, and she had two children with a different man, (this is discussed in her notes). I know that one of the sons, from records (my ancestor) was born in 1816, which means that after that, her relationship with Juzan was no longer, it is my feeling, it is at that time she came upon using the last name Trahern, not before.

Notes for UNKNOWN TRAHERN:


This is either Wesley or James Trahern, however, I have not been able to find enough proof as to whom it is. The evidence is pretty strong that it isn't Wesley. Of the brothers remaining, that leaves Samuel, who by all accounts appears to have never left Virginia, William who from his son's autobiography and other records doesn't appear in MS until about 1821, and James Sr. or Jr., although based on an 1820 census it looks like only James Sr. is old enough. I have seen a reference to James Sr. as a witness to a deed about 1814. From the census of 1820, it appears James has a wife, two daughters (or females), and a son. His brother Samuel also shows up, he has two men living with him, one would be his brother William's age, the other could be a son or a nephew. James Sr. apparently contested how William handled the will for their brother Wesley in 1832. I have not seen the court documents, but apparently, others have. Once the wills are viewed for Wesley, James Jr. and William, who all died in MS between 1825-1839 in Hinds County, perhaps more will be known.
       
Children of MARGARET and CHARLES JUZAN are:
       i.       PIERRE GABRIEL*4 JUZAN, b. 1793; d. August 1841, Pushmataha District, IT.

Notes for PIERRE GABRIEL* JUZAN:


Unknown wife, rumored to be Chickasaw. Attended Choctaw Academy 1828. Elected chief of Pushmataha distric 1838 for four year term. Hudson, Peter James. "A Story of Choctaw Chiefs" Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 17:13.

       ii.       DELILAH* JUZAN, b. Abt. 1798, Choctaw Nation, MS; d. 1859, Choctaw Nation, IT (OK); m. (1) JESSE BRASHEARS II1, Abt. 1816, Choctaw Nation, MS; b. Abt. 1788, Choctaw Nation, MS; d. August 9, 1827, Choctaw Nation, MS; m. (2) DAVID W. WALL, January 20, 1831, Marengo Co., Alabama; b. July 1, 1811; d. July 25, 1853, Indian Territory, OK.

Notes for DELILAH* JUZAN:

Mother was full choctaw, father 1/2 choctaw, thus she is 3/4 Choctaw. Mother is the Daughter of Chief Oklahoma, nephew of Chief Pushmataha.


Notes for JESSE BRASHEARS II:


1/4 Choctaw, died before Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. War of 1812, in Ben Shroots Battalion, AL.

Charles has death date as 8/9/1827, may have been in 1829


Notes for DAVID W. WALL:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

[Folsom2.FTW]

Note: There is a David Wall listed as parent on the Dawes, is this his son, and will this provide info on his mother?
David Wall evidently was involved in lawsuits in Alabama or Mississippi in 1838. He ran off with the sister of Delilah to Indian Territory. After her death, David, took up with two other women, sisters of his sister-in-law Mississippi Allen.

On 3 FEB 1874, Eugenia L. Dechard, by her attorney Robert H. Love, filed the following affidavit in the Pickens County, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory Records. It was part of a law suit, Dechard vs Roff, involving property rights.
"To the Hon County Court of Pickens Chickasaw Nation. Before the year of 1845, David Wall did in the State of Alabama Marry one Mrs Brushear, after marriage with the said Brushears, Wall did take up with a younger sister of his wife and came to the Choctaw Nation, here and of that conduct was a child born, Jack Juzan (Alias) Jack Wall. She died and the said Wall went back to Alabama and lived with his wife for a short time and came to the Chickasaw District, Choctaw Nation, and married Mrs Susan Guess. She died and said David Wall married one Miss Bailey of Texas about 1846. Said David Wall was never divorced from Mrs Brushears up to his death in 1853. His marriage to Miss Baily was illicit and the issue illegitimate...."

State of Texas } County of Grayson } In the County Court, June Term 1857


To the Hon Chief Justice of said County, your petitioner would respectfully show to your Hon Court that one David Wall departed this life sometime since leaving three children towit, Virginia, Zulingka, & David A. Wall, who are residents of the C. Nation and have considerable property in Grayson County which is necessary to have protected and also to sell and pay of the debts already due & unpaid therefore in view of the premises your petitioner respectfully request your Hon Court to appoint him Guardian of the persons and Estates of said minors who are all under the age of 14 years and as is duty bound will ever pray.

W. S. Burks



The State of Texas County of Grayson

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that I W. S. Burks as principal, and M. W. Japlin and J. V. Bailey as sureties, are held and firmly bound unto the Chief Justice of the county of Grayson, in the sum of Eight hundred dollars, for the payment of which, well and truly to be made, we hereby bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents; signed and sealed with our seals, the seals being scrawls, this 30th day of June A. D. 1857.

THE CONDITION OF THE ABOVE OBLIGATION IS SUCH, that whereas the above bounden W. S. Burks has been appointed by the Court Guardian of the person and Estate of the minors Virginia, Zulika and David Wall heirs at law of David Wall deceased.

Now if the said W. S. Burks shall well and truly perform all the duties required of him by law under said appointment, then this obligation shall be null and void; otherwise to be and remain in full force and effect.

W. S. Burks {Seal}

M. W. Japlin {Seal}

J. V. Bailey {Seal}

I W. S. Burks do solemnly swear that I will well and truly perform all the duties of Guardian of the person & Estate of the minors above mentioned to the best of my skill or ability so help me God.

W. S. Burks

Subscribed and sworn to before me }
This 30th day of June }
A. D. 1857 }
J. Bostick Clerk County Court County.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------



The State of Texas }
County of Grayson }


In County Court, July Term 1858

To the Hon B. P. Smith Chief Justice in said County.

Your Petitioners Zulinka, Virginia and David Ann Wall, by their next friend and guardian, William S. Burks, respectfully represents unto your Hon that David Wall, Father of said minors, departed this life intestate some five years ago in said County, that no administration has been on said Wall Estate, that he died seized and possessed of two Town lots, or parcels of land in the town of Sherman, Known on said Town plate as Lots No. 7 & 8 in Block two (2). That said lots are all the property belonging to said Estate, that said lots are estimated at three hundred Dollars, that nothing has ever been set apart for the aforesaid children as their allowances by said court. The premises considered, petitioners pray for an order and decree of your Hon Court to set apart said Lots to said children as their allowance for the support &c &c and as is duty bound will ever pray &c.

William S. Burks Guardian for Petitioners

[Filed July 26th, 1858]



       iii.       MARY* JUZAN, b. 1799, Choctaw Nation, MS; d. September 29, 1868, Ofahoma, MS; m. BENJAMIN LEFLORE, 1822, Frenchman's camp, Natchez Trace, MS; b. Abt. 1795; d. October 6, 1863, Leake County, MS.

Notes for BENJAMIN LEFLORE:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

Louis LeFlore served with Pushmataha under Andrew Jackson in the War of 1812 and he was promoted to the rank of Major for "Valor in the field". He was also in command of a Company in 1814 for three months in Russell's expedition to Alabama and in the campaign to Pensacola in 1814-15.

Nothing is known of the early years of Benjamin. As a child he traveled as his father moved the family first to LeFlores Bluff and then to Frenchman's Camp. He undoubtedly had much responsibility for operating the family enterprises at the latter place during his father's absences on military campaigns. There is no mention of where he received his schooling, but the fact that he valued education is shown by the fact that he set aside one room in the home he later built for his family as a school room. He does not appear in the United States Census of Mississippi for 1820, but in the 1830 enumeration, Benjamin LEFLORE is listed in that section of Simpson County containing the names of the residents of the "Indian Stations", Being described as "Between 20 and 40". No information was given as to his family, but such was the usual practice for Choctaws. Undoubtedly he was nearer 40 than 20 in 1830 as two of his daughters were married in 1832. On January 5, 1832 Sophia "LaFlour" and Jessie B. Witt were married in Madison County (Book "E" page 108), and on June 2 of the same year, Sarah LEFLORE married Iradell C. Groves in Madison County (book "E" Page 51). No more information has been found on Jessie B. and Sophia "LaFlour" Witt, but in the U.S. Census of 1850 a "D." Witt is living in the household of Benjamin LEFLORE. In 1899, the descendants of Daniel W. Witt stated that they were descendants of Benjamin LEFLORE, and that the father of Daniel Witt was Jess B. Witt and his mother was a daughter of Benjamin LEFLORE. Iradell C. and Sarah L. Groves appear with the family in the United States Census for the years 1840, 1850 and 1860 in Leake County. As Benjamin LEFLORE and his wife, Mary Juzan, were said to have had only ten or eleven children it is probable that the two daughters cited above had a different mother, from a previous marriage of Benjamin's. In the Armstrong survey of the Choctaws who had farms in cultivation at the time of the signing of the Dancing Rabbit Treaty in 1830, Benjamin LEFLORE is listed as having 100 acres in cultivation. In the Supplemental Articles to the above treaty, Benjamin LEFLORE is named as having a reservation of two sections (1280) acres of land instead of sharing any Tribal Lands west of the Mississippi River. One of the sections was to include his cultivated land and home site, and the other was to be located on any improved land in "LEFLORE's District".
These two sections were described as follows in the list of "Claims suspended for further examination in June of 1836; Claim #75 Section 32 Township 10 Range 6E Claim #190 Section 4 Township 21 Range 5E The final roll of Indian Claims Approved as made by Captain F. W. Armstrong, lists Benjamin LEFLORE as having claims approved for 1280 acres, but gives no description as to the location. Family tradition says that Benjamin LEFLORE moved his family to Leake County within a few years after the signing of The Dancing Rabbit Creek Treaty. Leake County Deed Books show that he purchased land from Richard and Martha Walker on December 19, 1835. In 1841, he was granted several United States patents for land in Leake County. Also he purchased land on the east bank of the Labutcha Creek from heirs of Chief Pushmataha, who had received it under the terms of the 1830 Treaty. Eventually he owned approximately 7000 acres stretching on both sides of the Meckanooekany River. About the time he received the United States Patents, Benjamin built a large home for the family near the banks of the river. It had a total of twelve large rooms with eight downstairs being divided by a fourteen-foot central hall. The wide porch ran across the full 80-foot expanse of the front of the home. One of the upstairs rooms was used as a schoolroom and the others as bedrooms. Fireplaces in four double chimneys heated the house. Descendants sold the house in 1904, and it was still occupied by the purchaser when it burned in 1906. Benjamin died in 1863, and Mary Juzan LEFLORE in 1868. They were buried in adjoining graves in the family cemetery, and their descendants erected an ornate double headstone in their memory. Vandals destroyed this in the 1970's. The graveyard and home site have been the scenes of repeated instances of vandalism over the past hundred years, seeking to recover a horde of gold which Benjamin was rumored to have buried in his last years. In the period of the 1930's and 1940's, the Federal Land Bank took title to much of the land that had belonged to Benjamin. Since then, descendants have been able to regain some of the land, and it is now in their possession.

Many of the descendants of Mary and Benjamin stayed in Mississippi, while others went to the Choctaw Nation areas in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

       iv.       REBECCA* JUZAN, b. 1804; d. May 4, 1854, Atoka co. IT; m. (1) JOHN BOND, February 25, 1825, Marengo County, Alabama; b. Abt. 1800; d. Abt. 1831, Choctaw Nation, MS; m. (2) GEORGE W. WALKER, January 19, 1832, Sumter Co, Alabama; b. Abt. 1800; d. Unknown.

Notes for JOHN BOND:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

Listed in Supplement 2, Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek[play.FTW]

[Mieirs.ftw]

Listed in Supplement 2, Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek

Notes for GEORGE W. WALKER:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

1885 San bois, possible son...
188. Walker, George W., 39, M/I, Physician, 80 ac.
189. Walker, Sarah, 22, F/I, ,
190. Walker, William, 8, M/I, ,
191. Walker, Cora, 4, F/I, ,
192. Walker, Arthur, 3, M/I, ,


       v.       WILLAIM* JUZAN, b. 1805; d. Unknown; m. HARRIET BRASHEARS I, September 1831, Sumter Co, Alabama; b. Abt. 1812; d. Unknown.
       vi.       JACKSON* JUZAN, b. 1808; d. 1860, Atoka co. IT; m. MISSISSIPPI ALLEN, Bet. 1835 - 1846; b. March 18, 1812; d. December 4, 1865, Indian Territory.
       vii.       LUCY* JUZAN, b. 1809; d. Unknown; m. (1) WESLEY BRASHEARS TRAHERN, 1829, alabama; b. 1808, choctaw Territory, MS; d. Bef. 1838, mississipi; m. (2) AMOS W. GARY, Bef. 1840, Mississippi; b. Abt. 1810; d. Unknown.

Notes for LUCY* JUZAN:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

on the 1855/56 census was the following:
Pushmataha District, Atoka Co.
A.W. Gary
Lucy Gary (Juzan)
Amelia Gary ( this is Amelia Trahern, dtr of Wesley and Lucy)
Pierse Trahern
Charles Gary
Lucrecia Gary
Jackson Wall (son of her younger half sister and David Wall)
Charles Juzan (whose son???)
Washington

Note from Sandra on documents she found at archives
Self emigration from the old Nation in 1841:
heirs of Lucy Gary
Emigration of AW Gary
emigration of Charles "
emigration of Amelia Trahern
emigration of Jesse Trahern
emigration of Pierre Trahern
emigration of William Trahern

emigration of slaves Eliza, Elizabeth, Silla

One of the papers is signed by guess who, Eliza A. Flack
Sandra


Notes for WESLEY BRASHEARS TRAHERN:


1/8 choctaw.

From researcher, Loretta Coppick, dec. notes via RTShauhan, Wesley appointed William Juzan as a "kind of" trustee of his land for his wife and children.

1831 Armstrong Rolls, Wesley Train (another misspelling)
natachachi's district. 6 in household, one over 16 (probably sister Amelia), one under 10, 3 slaves, located W. Side of Tombigee River.

Named in Supplement 2 of Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek to obtain one section of land. (as Wesley Train).

       viii.       ELIZA ANN* JUZAN, b. 1819, Indian Territory, MS; d. July 25, 1890, Atoka co. IT; m. HUGH C. FLACK2, Abt. 1835; b. March 10, 1817, Bourbon Co, KY; d. June 6, 1860, Atoka co. IT.

Notes for ELIZA ANN* JUZAN:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

1885 Atoka County
Flack, Eliza Ann, 66, FI, Farmer
Caie, Mary, 12, FI,
Hasket, Eliza Ann, 9, FI, (her neice's daughter?)
Brown, Sophia , 14, FI,
Hodges, Amanda, 54, FI,
Hodges, Lizzie, 11, FI,
Hodges, Alice, 10, FI,



Will of Eliza Ann Flack
Atoka April 2, 1889

In the name of God, AMEN
I, E A Flack believe in Jesus Christ, AMEN.
I am well this morning and in my right mind. This is my last will. When I am gone I want my will to be carried out as stated. I give my homestead and house and Organ, bureau, bedstead to Czarina Hebert. I give to Olive Hebert my wash stand, my big lloking glass, my rocking chare, 1 feather bed, 4 quilts, 2 pillows, my hack and 2 ponies. I give to Alice hebert, my gold watch and chain, 4 quilts, one feather bed and bedstead, 2 pillars, my clock, my trunk, one rocking chair and I am satisfied inmy mind that Louisiana and Willie Bassett would not let anything that was in my house go in thier house. I give Louisianna my ranch on Caney, all my claim of coal on the Fry place. E. A. F. (Her Grandchildren)

I give to J.W. Caie, Mary E. Caie's bedstead and feather bed, her large picture, 2 pillows, 3 quilts, her sheep, my lounge and mattress, Mary's bureau and Amelia's large bible. E.A. Flack (Her son in law, her daughter and granddaughter had already died)

I give to Pierr Juzan my cow ranch, and all my tricks in my house, 4 cows and calves and one mare and colt. E.A. Flack. (Nephew, not sure which brother is father)

I give to Eliza Ann Thicket, Charles Geary's feather bed shich I've kept 30 years or more, my cook stove and all my dishes and part of my wearing clothes and the other half of my clothes to Mary Leodon Juzan Mother. E. A. Flack (This is more than likely, her neice's daughter. Charles Geary would have been the uncle of Eliza Ann Thicket. Not sure who Mary Leodon Juzan is)

I, Eliza Ann Flack when I am dead, I want Pierr Juzan to gather all my cattle and few ponies and every little article in my house down to my carpet, pillows, innything that will bring a dime must be sold for cash down. No credit. I wisht that McClure would buy the cattle. Czarina Robb and Czarina B. Hebert must gather everything about the place to sell and have a sell. Set a time. Pierr Juzan will see about the out property. What little I left I bome by it honestly and I want it to go out honestly. I want all that I have willed to each one to have what I have given them and then have the sale. Divide the money equally to my 4 granddaughters, Louisiana, Alice, Czarina, Olive. Amen.

All trades that I, E. A. Flack have made must stand good.

Eliza Ann Flack, this is my own handwriting, my own, my own mind. I done as I please and I feel right. This is my last wll. E. A. Flack.

signed in the presence of this day and date above written. Witnesses Joseph J. Phillip, Alinfton Felb, N.B. Ainsworth

Recorded in this record book the 4th of Augus 1890

W. Bassett Co. Clerk, Aproved this 4th of Aug 1890

Silas J Jawett County and Probate Judge.
From Choctaw Vol. 1, in Indian Archives Division OK. Historical Society. Copy generously provided by Ron Shauhan, given to him by L. Coppick, ggggranddaughter of John Charles Juzan.


NOTE:: Czarina Robb was the widow of three of Eliza Ann's nephews, Charles Brashears (daughter of sister Delilah), and Pier Trahern (daughter of sister Lucy)




Children of her daughter (name from census card) only claim 1/16. I can in no way find how this is possible. Even if Peggy Trahern was the daughter of Shanke and a white man, Eliza Ann was still 1/2 choctaw, and her 1/2 brother James (based on her claim that Peggy was her mother) claimed 1/2 blood status, and his children did as well (his wife was 1/2, actually her sister Margaret claimed 3/8).

Since my the evidence of the Deed from Oklahoma to Phoebe, and Juzan's children, it would seem that Eliza Ann was Phoebe's daughter, but she through her descendants testimonies, stated she was the youngest of 8 children (by her mother), and her mother was Peggy. She still would have been more than 1/4 choctaw which is all by the claims of her grandchildren that she could be on the Dawes. Additonal note, is that all the Juzan's on the Dawes claim full blood status, which even though they married other Choctaws, still supports the claim that Eliza Ann Flack was more than stated.


Eliza was a prominent member of the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma; an article about her appeared in the August-September, 1980 issue of "Frontier Times". She was described as being very beautiful, of French-Indian ancestry. The location of her marriage to Hugh Flack is unknown; shortly thereafter they moved to Texas, but eventually they traveled to the Choctaw Nation territory in Oklahoma. After the death of her husband and son, Zeno, in a "gun fight", Eliza engaged in a number of businesses. She put in the pioneer equivalent of a motel, where teamsters on the "Texas Road" could rest themselves. She also opened a store and speculated in real estate. She prospered in everything she attempted and soon had a reputation for her business acumen and charities. The local minister, the very popular Rev. Murrow, a Baptist preacher, once had some doubts about her compassion -- some Plains Indians, probably Kiowas, rode into town with a white woman, supposedly a captive they were holding for ransom. The reverend immediately began scurrying around to raise money, blankets, and other items demanded; to his surprise, Eliza refused to donate anything. He eventually secured enough to satisfy the Indians, who loaded the loot on their horses, and left their alleged captive. But as they started to leave, the woman ran out, jumped on a horse and rode away with them, laughing derisively; Eliza then told the reverend that she knew that the "captive" was a phony. In her will, dated April 2, 1889, she distributed her sizeable estate among her many grandchildren, as well as to Pierre Juzan and J. W. Caie. Her tombstone, in the Atoka Cemetery, includes a lengthy tribute to her charity and to her faithfulness to the Baptist Church.




Notes for HUGH C. FLACK:
[

Suppposedly killed in "gun fight" near family cattle pens by Colonel D.F. Harkina over cattle.
       
Children of MARGARET and UNKNOWN TRAHERN are:
       ix.       JEREMIAH4 TRAHERN3, b. Abt. 1813; d. Aft. 1845.

Notes for JEREMIAH TRAHERN:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

The only reference thus far I have found is the land document for Peggy Trahern as to his existance.

       x.       JAMES N. TRAHERN3,4,5,6,7, b. Abt. 1816, choctaw Territory, MS; d. March 29, 1883, Trahern Station Skullyville Co., Choctaw Nation, IT., (OK); m. (1) SARAH HALL II8,9,10,11,12, September 1843, Skullyville CO., Choctaw Nation, IT., OK; b. Abt. 1827, Sumter, AL; d. December 28, 1873, Trahern Station, Skullyville Co., Choctaw Nation, IT (OK); m. (2) VIRGINIA PARALLI CLOSSEN, Abt. 1877, Skullyville County, IT (OK); b. 1852, Fort Smith, AR; d. 1907, Antlers, IT.

Notes for JAMES N. TRAHERN:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

1855 census, there was a James Trahern - in his household there was
Sally, Robert, Levina, Lysander, James & Catherine.


Land scrip dated 1851, where Peggy sells her land, does give the name of the children. They are not, as published in other places Amelia and Letha. Land sold to Harriet Sims. Land documented as East 1/2 of fractional section 7, Lots 1,6,7,8,9,14, & 15, (287.08 acres) township 22N range 5e and nw fractional section 8, lots 3,4,5, & 6 (147.27 acres) of township 15n range 1E.

9. OKALAHHOMA3 (NAHOMTIMA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Bet. 1780 - 1784 in Choctaw Nation, MS, and died 1845 in Lauderdale County, MS. He married (1) ANONTOMA. She was born Abt. 1800 in Choctaw Nation, MS, and died Aft. 1839.

Notes for OKALAHHOMA:


Shortly Chief of the Choctaws following Pushmataha's death. Pushmataha was the brother of his mother. Oklahoma was succeeded by Nittakachih as Chief, who by most, is thought to be his brother.
He did not move to Oklahoma Territory.

See Notes on Phoebe also.

Oklahoma is often given the name Fillecuthy, Fillecutchy. I think it is because he has been linked to Polly Cravaat as his first wife, and because following his name on the supplement to the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek is Polly Fillecuthy. Polly is listed seperately on the Armstrong rolls, and it is my opinion, she is the widow of a man named Fillecutchy, and not Oklahoma's first wife, whose name I do not know. I have been told, a list of his children is in the Oklahoma historical volumes, but I have not had the chance to research this.

According to additional notes from Halbert, in 1844 Oklahoma made a statement on October 3, 1844, shortly before his death, that he was appoximately 60. He had two wives, the second being Anontoma (Anon Tooner on the deed in 1840). Jack Amos stated the names of his children as he remembered them were Tomaho (?unreadable) , Tahenatubbee, General Dale, and two girls, Pisatima and Hotoma. Per the court of claims his children were Winna (dead), Pissatemah (dead), Immanhola (dead), Himmonahtubbee (dead), Tahanahtubbee, and Cunnaomatubbee over 10, and Sahhotona under 10. By this statement, Phoebe could easily been one of the three children living, but listed as her indian name. Oklahoma was buried near Coosha town, in what is now Lauderdale County, MS. Oklahoma was chief for a brief time after the death of his Uncle. He was removed for dissipation and succeeded by Nitakechi. The town of Ofahoma, is rumored to be named after Oklahoma.
       
Child of OKALAHHOMA and ANONTOMA is:
       i.       SAHHOTONA4, b. Abt. 1834; d. Unknown.
       
Children of OKALAHHOMA are:
       ii.       PHOEBE4, b. Abt. 1800; d. Aft. 1839; m. CHARLES JUZAN, Abt. 1815, Alabama?; b. Abt. 1775; d. 1839.

Notes for PHOEBE:


Full choctaw. The children attributed to Peggy by him I came up with through a list of all his children, and information on a deed given to Phoebe, and her children by John Juzan. The ones not on the deed I attributed to Peggy, as I could see no other reason for the omission of their names from the deed.

Information from a Deed. The maiden and former married names of the women I added in parenthesis.

Deed in Trust to Hugh Mcdonald for Phebe Juzan, et al.

Know all men by these presents that we Oka lah homa and Anon tooner wife of the said Oklahoma, both of the state of Mississippi, and County of Lauderdale, for and in consideration of the many acts of friendship shoun to us by Charles Juzan, deceased in his lifetime, and also for the love we have for Phebe, wife of the said Charles Juzan deceased and for the following named children of the said Charles Juzan viz:
Delilah (Juzan Brashears) Wall, Mary (Juzan) Lafloor, Rebecca (Juzan) Walker, Lucy (Juzan Trahern) Gary, Subbill (juzan) Walker, Eliza Ann (juzan) Flack, Pier Juzan, and Jackson Juzan, we have made and by these presents give and grant unto our truly trusted friend Hugh McDonald, of the county Kemput and State aforesaid the following tract of land, lying in said county of Lauderdale, and state of aforesaid viz: the west half of section 30 in township eight north of range seventeen eas, whish was located by George W. Martin, by virtue of a right of reservation secured to the said Oklahoma by the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek to have and to hold the same in trust for the only use and benefit of the said Phebe Juzan for and during her natural life, and then in trust forever for the use of the abobe named children of Charles juzan and Phebe Juzan and the hiers and assigns of the said above named children to have and to hold all of the above described land for en for its use and!
turst aforesaid. Our said trusty friend being required to release to each of the above named children, after the death of the said Phebe, such sutable share as the whole tract being divided by eight will amount to . And we do hereby authorize and empower the said Hugh Mcdonald to do and perform all such acts as may be necessary to enable him fully to secure a perfect title by obtaining a patente for such said land from the Government of the United Sates of America and fully to execute the trust herby reposed in him and for ourselves and our heirs, we hereby do and will ratify forever all, of the foregoing premises of these presents and also all than can or may result there from. In witness of her which we have born to subscribed our names and affixed our scrolls by way of our seals, this 16th day of March, A.d. 1840. Oklahoma and Anon Tooner's x mark and seal, In presence of John Stale and James Millam his x mark



Notes for CHARLES JUZAN:


Rumored to be 1/2 choctaw
Children's names with asterisks do not have the relationship of their mother proven. See notes under Phoebe, and below.

The family of John Charles Juzan, and his wives is a mass of rumor and contradiction. I am attempting to discuss the information here, as I doubt that we will ever have substantial "proof".

From Hebert and Ball, Creek War 1813-1814, Ch. 3
Pierre Juzan, a noted French Indian countryman, at this time was living at Chunky Town. He had settled among the Choctaws in early life, and had married a Choctaw woman, a niece of Pushmataha, and raised an Indian family. He spoke English, French, and Choctaw with equal fluency. Juzan had several trading houses among the Choctaws, one being at Coosha Town, situated three or four miles southeast of old Daleville, on the right bank of Issuba In Kannia bok (Lost Horse Creek), and another at Chunky. His dwelling house at Chunky was on the west side of the creek and about two hundred yards from it. He had here an apple orchard,--a rare thing in an Indian country--the trees or scions for which he had brought from France. He also had another residence at Coosha. Juzan died about 1840, at Tuscahoma, on the Tombigbee. Some time after his death, his family, with the exception of a daughter, emigrated west.


The details that he describes of the life of Pierre Juzan, mirror that of Charles Juzan. So the question is, was there a Pierre and Charles Juzan, that were brothers, either half or full brothers, or was Charles Juzan known as Pierre, then Charles?

From Halbert, H.S. in The Sketches of Choctaws, Mingo's and Indian countrymen and families
we find the statement that Oklahoma had two sisters, one married to Pierre, and the other to Charles, he further goes on to say that Pierre was the uncle of Charles, which couldn't be true. Pierre Francois Juzan was raised by his mother's family. His father died before his birth in the French Indian wars, and his mother died within a few months after his birth. If there was a Pierre at the same time as John Charles Juzan it was either his father or a brother.

We know from the deed from Oklahoma to Phoebe Juzan, and from her filing a dower claim in Washington County, (I think AL) in 1839, that she was married to Juzan. However, she was not the sister of Oklahoma, but his daughter. The legend of Shanke comes from, I believe records in different historical societies that come from the descendants of Eliza Ann Flack. Eliza Ann Flack, handed down the following statement to her descendants ....

Successor as Chief fell to his nephew (on his wife's side) by name of Oklahoma. He had a nephew named Nitakachieubih (Nitakechi). Pushmataha's sister was Natona. Her daughter Shanke who had a daughter. Natona's great grand daughter was Eliza Ann Juzan Flack. John Charles Juzan took 2 wives, nieces of Pushmataha -- Peggy Trahern and Phoebe, dau of Oklahome.




Whichever theory is true, undoubtedly, Peggy Trahern's relationship with John Charles Juzan fell apart, and she had two children with a different man, (this is discussed in her notes). I know that one of the sons, from records (my ancestor) was born in 1816, which means that after that, her relationship with Juzan was no longer, it is my feeling, it is at that time she came upon using the last name Trahern, not before.

       iii.       WINNA, b. Unknown; d. Bef. 1844.
       iv.       PISSATEMAH, b. Unknown; d. Bef. 1844.
       v.       IMMANHOLA, b. Unknown; d. Bef. 1844.
       vi.       HIMMONAHTUBBEE, b. Unknown; d. Bef. 1844.
       vii.       TAHANAHTUBBEE, b. Unknown; d. Aft. 1844.
       viii.       CUNNAOMATUBBEE, b. Unknown; d. Aft. 1845.

10. NITAKECHI3 (NAHOMTIMA2, UNKNOWN1 CHOCTAW) was born Abt. 1785, and died Abt. 1845 in Lauderdale county, MS. He married (2) KIAMICHI, daughter of MUSHATABBEE. She was born Abt. 1792, and died Unknown.

Notes for KIAMICHI:
Rumored, not proven
       
Children of NITAKECHI are:
       i.       HENRY4 GROVES, b. Abt. 1800; d. Aft. 1830.

Notes for HENRY GROVES:
Have seen reference he became a missionary, and changed his name to Henry Byrington.

       ii.       JACKSON NITAKECHI, b. Abt. 1802; d. Aft. 1845.
       iii.       DAUGHTER NITAKECHI, b. Abt. 1804; d. Unknown; m. TUNAPAHO HUMMA; b. Abt. 1800; d. Aft. 1845.

Notes for TUNAPAHO HUMMA:
[Mieirsmerged.FTW]

Red Gum[play.FTW]

[Mieirs.ftw]

Red Gum



Endnotes

1. Brashears, Charles.
2. Ron Shauhan, Ron Shauhan.
3. Choctaw Scrip dated 1851.
4. 1855 Skullyville IT Census.
5. Laverne Shirley, "Family biography by Laverne Shirley."
6. Doug Barkley.
7. Dawes Census Card.
8. Laverne Shirley, "Family biography by Laverne Shirley."
9. Dawes Census Card.
10. 1885 Skullyville IT census.
11. Doug Barkley.
12. Choctaw Scrip dated 1851.